Environment

Agriculture imposes external costs upon society through pesticides, nutrient runoff, excessive water usage, loss of natural environment and assorted other problems.

 

Over 98% of sprayed insecticides and 95% of herbicides reach a destination other than their target species, because they are sprayed or spread across entire agricultural fields.[1] Runoff can carry pesticides into aquatic environments while wind can carry them to other fields, grazing areas, human settlements and undeveloped areas, potentially affecting other species. Other problems emerge from poor production, transport and storage practices.[2] Over time, repeated application increases pest resistance, while its effects on other species can facilitate the pest's resurgence.[3]

Each pesticide or pesticide class comes with a specific set of environmental concerns. Such undesirable effects have led many pesticides to be banned, while regulations have limited and/or reduced the use of others. Over time, pesticides have generally become less persistent and more species-specific, reducing their environmental footprint. In addition the amounts of pesticides applied per hectare have declined, in some cases by 99%. However, the global spread of pesticide use, including the use of older/obsolete pesticides that have been banned in some jurisdictions, has increased overall.[4]

 

Many of the chemicals used in pesticides are persistent soil contaminants, whose impact may endure for decades and adversely affect soil conservation.[41]

The use of pesticides decreases the general biodiversity in the soil. Not using the chemicals results in higher soil quality,[42]with the additional effect that more organic matter in the soil allows for higher water retention.[31] This helps increase yields for farms in drought years, when organic farms have had yields 20-40% higher than their conventional counterparts.[43] A smaller content of organic matter in the soil increases the amount of pesticide that will leave the area of application, because organic matter binds to and helps break down pesticides.[31]

Degradation and sorption are both factors which influence the persistence of pesticides in soil. Depending on the chemical nature of the pesticide, such processes control directly the transportation from soil to water, and in turn to air and our food. Breaking down organic substances, degradation, involves interactions among microorganisms in the soil. Sorption affects bioaccumulation of pesticides which are dependent on organic matter in the soil. Weak organic acids have been shown to be weakly sorbed by soil, because of pH and mostly acidic structure. Sorbed chemicals have been shown to be less accessible to microorganisms. Aging mechanisms are poorly understood but as residence times in soil increase, pesticide residues become more resistant to degradation and extraction as they lose biological activity.[44]

 

Nitrogen fixation, which is required for the growth of higher plants, is hindered by pesticides in soil.[45] The insecticides DDTmethyl parathion, and especially pentachlorophenol have been shown to interfere with legume-rhizobium chemical signaling.[45] Reduction of this symbiotic chemical signaling results in reduced nitrogen fixation and thus reduced crop yields.[45] Root nodule formation in these plants saves the world economy $10 billion in synthetic nitrogen fertilizer every year.[46]

Pesticides can kill bees and are strongly implicated in pollinator decline, the loss of species that pollinate plants, including through the mechanism of Colony Collapse Disorder,[47][48][49][50][unreliable source?] in which worker bees from a beehive or western honey bee colony abruptly disappear. Application of pesticides to crops that are in bloom can kill honeybees,[23]which act as pollinators. The USDA and USFWS estimate that US farmers lose at least $200 million a year from reduced crop pollination because pesticides applied to fields eliminate about a fifth of honeybee colonies in the US and harm an additional 15%.[1]

On the other side, pesticides have some direct harmful effect on plant including poor root hair development, shoot yellowing and reduced plant growth.[51]

In 2015, we are a leading provider of non-toxic farming pesticide using chilli and garlic- natural ingredient in our solution - that pungent smells helps to repel pest and is biodegradable under sunlight,

With swiss- technology, we are able to create nano particle solution which is very small and able to create at such concentration to mix with water (3:100) , which is very economical for farmers, and the solution contains micro nutrient for the growth improvement of the crops.

beef and agricultural products. Our company owns and operates a strategic balance of properties, feedlots and farms comprising around 7 million hectares of land in Queensland and the Northern Territory. This equates to roughly 1% of Australia's land mass. Having been established in 1987, we are the oldest continuously operating company.We are committed to developing our operating systems using the world's best practices and have company-wide accreditation through quality assurance programs. With an established track record of environmentally sensitive land use, we are one of the first companies to employ our own field rangelands. Over the past decade, we have expanded into value-adding pork through the Branded Pork division of the company.

We are a world-leading provider of beef and agricultural products. Our company owns and operates a strategic balance of properties, feedlots and farms comprising around 7 million hectares of land in Queensland and the Northern Territory.

This equates to roughly 1% of Australia's land mass. Having been established in 1987, we are the oldest continuously operating company.We are committed to developing our operating systems using the world's best practices and have company-wide accreditation through quality assurance programs. With an established track record of environmentally sensitive land use, we are one of the first companies to employ our own field rangelands.

Over the past decade, we have expanded into value-adding pork through the Branded Pork division of the company. We are prominent leader in the agribusiness; specializing in the cultivation, production and trading of animal feed and essential human food commodities such as corn, fruits, flour and vegetables. Since its inception, we have witnessed unmatched growth fuelled by an active foreign investment strategy, establishing various acquisitions and joint ventures with specialized feed and food producers worldwide. We are own and operate a large asset base including a land bank of 340 thousand acres, 4 forage pressing and production plants and 2 flour milling plants.